26 Sep 2016

Coalseam Conservation Park

Irwin River
The 140 km long Irwin River, at its mouth, separates the towns of Dongara where we had spent the night, and Port Denison.

We didn't know it at that time, but we were to cross and re-cross this river many times on this day, both in the car and on foot.

Our first stop of the day, was the Coalseam Conservation Park.  

We have never been to this Park, which was reputed to be full of wildflowers this time of the year, and I was hoping to see the place covered with carpets of wildflowers, something I remember seeing on our trip of 1993 a little further north.

Here are a few scans of photographs I took then.  
Memories from 1993
The Irwin River runs through the Coalseam Park; at this stage it appears to be a mere trickle, as at different stages of its journey, it runs underground.
Walking through the Park, we had to cross this river bed at different points.
The carpets of flowers that I was keen to see, though, were there in abundance.



The yellow ones are like little pom-poms, and that, indeed,  is what they are commonly called.
While there are others of similar colour, there are also many different ones - I have no idea what they are called, though.




From the river bed, you can look up towards these towering cliffs ...
... and this is the view from the top.
Note the yellow wildflowers between all the trees
Quite a few hours were spent here, before we left this Park and continued on our journey to Mullewa and Yalgoo.



12 comments:

  1. Hi Arthur, it's so beautiful to have these wild flowers in such abundance. Did you need to enhance their colours since photographs tend to fade over time?

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    1. Hi Doc, Not quite sure what you mean. I seldom print my digital pics. The 1993 pics were scanned many years ago.

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    2. That figures it! The colors were still fresh! The pictures were not recently scanned from old prints.

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    3. Ah, yes. Pics taken in 93, probably scanned 98 or so. Pics were in an album which is not opened often, so little exposure to light.

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  2. Wowwwwww!!! That's a beautiful shot of the river - I can feel the serenity, the tranquility. Lovely flowers, so colourful. Grandma sure looks happy, grinning from ear to ear.

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    1. haha, yes, she's been asking me to go see the wildflowers for quite a few years. Finally we did it.

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  3. In the two photos above the ostrich photo, there is someone with very long hair and much slimmer built than Arthur the Buddhaji. Is that Arthur the Swamiji of a past era?

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    1. That's no ostrich, Prof. That's one half of our coat of arms. And also that's not me, Prof. That was Grandma C modelling for me.

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    2. Oops, how ignorant of me! Of course, that's an emu and that's Grandma C, not Grandpa Z.
      I'm amazed at the variety of Ozzie flowers in spring. I was wondering if there is any Ozzie flower poetry written. I googled and found some nice poems by two well-known Ozzie poets Henry Kendall and Henry Lawson. There's a nice poem "September in Australia" by Kendall in http://jendi.bowmeow.com.au/poetry1.html#sept .
      I think you will like it.

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    3. Thanks for the poetry reference, Prof. There are reportedly 12,000 species of wildflower in WA, and about 60% of which are unique to this part of the world.

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  4. Hello Arthur - these photos are breathtaking....Love wild flowers!!

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    1. We had to travel quite some distance to get to see these, but it was worth it.

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